Saturday Essay

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    WSJ Guide to Wine

    Is there a right way to drink wine? Download the new ebook by Wall Street Journal wine columnists Will Lyons and Lettie Teague for your primer on everything from choosing a bottle to creating your ideal cellar, at wsj.com/guidetowine.

From Review

From Leisure & Arts

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    A Napoleon of Crime

    Jonathan Wild orchestrated muggings, then took credit—and payment—for the return of stolen goods and the capture of the criminals.

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    The Doctor Will See You Now

    If you were sick in 1831, you might have been wise to avoid doctors all together.

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    The Open's Patron Saint

    Should an athlete become an activist? Does a black athlete have a choice?

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    Live From Karachi

    A WSJ editor becomes a soap star in Pakistan. Mira Sethi reviews a history of Karachi.

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    Mysteries: A Death in Dublin

    Rivalry, jealousy and intense alliances at a posh Irish girls school—then a murder.

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    Trade by Other Means

    In the Opium War, China won at most one battle—and even that was largely due to the weather.

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    Financing the Founders

    Robert Morris built a French-style palace out of Pennsylvania logs in the hope that Marie Antoinette would visit.

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    Windows to the Soul

    Architecture, like clothes, goes in and out of fashion. Will spartan ranch homes one day be all the rage?

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    Children's Books: Seasonal Swoon

    A picture book that makes the arrival of autumn positively refreshing.

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    Why Werner Herzog Hates Chickens

    The acclaimed filmmaker's considered opinion on hand-sanitizer dispensers: "They are an abomination."

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    Fiction Chronicle: A Masterpiece of Conceptual Art

    A much-anticipated second novel turns out to be about how to write a much-anticipated second novel.

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    The Permafrost Express

    Laying one particularly difficult section of track for the Trans-Siberian Railway cost one-seventh of the Russian empire's annual income.

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    Gastronomy: Just Desserts

    Bourbon's hint of caramel sweetness makes it a natural flavoring agent for cakes, cookies and ice cream.

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    Five Best: Jacqueline Winspear

    The author, most recently, of "'The Care and Management of Lies: A Novel of the Great War" recommends novels about postwar angry young men.

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    Hints for the Occupied

    For most Parisians, occupation was neither collaboration nor resistance, but a struggle to survive, to make do and avoid confrontation.

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    The Creator of 'Homeland' Reviews a Thriller About Drones

    When a drone operator follows a strike order that kills 13 Afghans, he comes undone. Sounds like a plot from 'Homeland' or '24.'

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    Collegiate Collisions

    The hulking Notre Dame tackle Frank Hanley, asked what he took at college, offered this cheerful rejoinder: 'Baths!'

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    Practice Makes Imperfect

    He encounters physicians who insist on expensive, useless remedies and terminally ill patients who ask in vain to forgo treatment.

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    Called to the Polls

    Mormons are unlikely to hear politics preached from the pulpit. So how are they one of the most politically cohesive groups in the U.S.?

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    The Men of Autumn

    Football is now the national pastime—its fast, violent, telegenic nature captures the spirit of our times. It's easier to bet on, too.

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    A Secret History of Rock

    Tripping through time to discover what connects Buddy Holly, Beyoncé, Ben E. King and the Sex Pistols.

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    Put It on the Paper's Tab

    An expense claim from a trip to a Phnom Penh opium den was reclassified to describe the purchase as whiskey.

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    The Man Behind the Age

    Thucydides praised Pericles for his ability to tame and control the wild beast of democracy.

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    At Home in Number 10

    In the midst of World War I, the prime minister's wife made sure her husband got in his rounds of golf.

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    Everyday Life in a Landscape of Death

    For British soldiers in World War I, a grueling war on friendly territory produced tensions of the kind associated with hostile occupations.

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    Rush Chair Turns on Dartmouth Bros

    I knew the brothers of Dartmouth's Sigma Alpha Epsilon as having a taste for pastel critter pants, not sadism.

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    Children's Books: Lessons From Life, and From Books

    Jacqueline Woodson writes vividly about growing up as a 'brown girl' in 1960s South Carolina.

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    Apocalypse Without End

    A novel that refuses to domesticate the Holocaust, even by crafting a satisfying narrative around the horror.

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    Ghost Stories for Grown-Ups

    Robert Aickman was a master of the creepy, the uncanny and the strange.

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    Fiction Chronicle: That Way Madness

    Is a husband's odd behavior the symptom of a struggling marriage or the first sign of a terrible disease?

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    Five Best: Robert H. Patton

    The author of "Hell Before Breakfast," a history of America's first war correspondents, recommends books on war's transformations.

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    Motley Crew at the Helm

    Egalitarianism was being acted out at sea by pirates half a century before it became a catch-cry of the French Revolution.

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    The Credentials Arms-Race

    Students sacrifice all to grades and resume building—'I might be miserable,' a Yalie noted, 'but were I not miserable, I wouldn't be at Yale.'

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    Presidents and Punch Lines

    In every election since 1992, the GOP presidential nominee has been the butt of more jokes than the Democrat. Surprised?

Food

Fashion

Travel

Autos

Sports

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    The Mandatory Fun of Football

    Jason Gay: The NFL, which returns on Thursday, is no longer a weekend diversion—it's a bombastic, schedule-hogging, full-time occupation, with weeks of homework and preparation and cultural pressure.

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